Well’s Blog: Concussions

In my lifetime, I have had three concussions. A concussion is a jarring injury of the brain, resulting in the disturbance of cerebral function.

I can tell you that frankly, they suck. What makes it even worse is that this, my most recent concussion, is my third one in less than a year.

The first head injury to occur to me was the winter of my freshman year during wrestling. I was doing well in my match until the kid threw me over his head. I landed on the right side of my cranium and blacked out.

Once I was pinned, I stumbled off the mat to my coach who then took me to the trainer. After being diagnosed with a concussion, I sat out of any physical activity for a little over a week.

A professional trainer or doctor can diagnose an athlete by putting them through a series of memory tests, usually done online. These tests are called ImPACT tests. I was told to refrain myself from any physical activity, television watching or video game playing. I experienced multiple moments of confusion, a nonstop headache, and some memory problems during my injury.

The second concussion was dealt to me at the beginning of my sophomore year during football season.

I went to block an opponent from Salem while playing wide receiver and he head butted me, causing my brain to rattle in my head. After the game I was diagnosed by our athletic trainer who tested me with multiple memory quizzes. She told to stay out of any physical activity and other things that make my brain work hard. The recovery time was again for only a week and I was back to sports. Again, I experienced confusion and headaches during my injury.

The third and most recent concussion was also the most severe.

It was again during wrestling when my teammate picked me up and threw me on my head. I landed face first and bounced off the ground. This one screwed me up even more than the past two. I was out of any physical activity for four weeks. My headaches would not go away and I had trouble remembering things. I finally was cleared and allowed to do activities on January 30.

Concussions are a hassle, but also very serious. I have learned to be more careful while doing participating in physical activities. I still plan to be involved in the same sports I am in now for the rest of my high school career.

If one day I have children, I will tell them about my experiences with brain injuries and I will warn them of how serious they can be. Concussions can cause you to have serious brain damage and possibly put you in a wheelchair.

While it is important to be a part of your team, it is more important to treat yourself first. Concussions can limit you in many ways. Fortunately, I can still be involved in the sports I love.

 Story by Ethan Wells